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Spider Movies are proud to make only one film at a time, investing 100% of their skill, creative energy and production experience into the on-going production. This results in them winning numerous Awards for BBC, National Geographic, PBS Nature and Discovery. 

Fieldcraft and expertise in very remote areas

Volga Delta into the Caspian Sea

Volga Delta into the Caspian Sea

Volga Delta into the Caspian Sea

Astrakhan Delta, Russia

Nature documentaries cameraman, Ian McCarthy and producer, Fergus Beeley film lotus flowers in bloom in the Volga Delta near Astrakhan, Russia for the wildlife film that opened the series 'Realms of the Russian Bear'.

Talan Island, Sea of Okhotsk

Volga Delta into the Caspian Sea

Volga Delta into the Caspian Sea

Talan island, Sea of Okhotsk in the Russian eastern Arctic

Making nature documentaries requires travel to extraordinarily distant and remote places from London. This location is called Talan island in the Sea of Okhotsk, a tiny remote island with 3 million seabirds and 3 of us living in a yurt for the summer. It was a sequence for the award winning wildlife film series called 'Realms of the Russian Bear'.

Jacutia, Eastern Siberia, Russia

Volga Delta into the Caspian Sea

Ellesmere Island, Northern Canada

Evenck reindeer herders, Jacutia, E Siberia

Living with the Evenck reindeer herders  in the larch forests of Jacutia, eastern Siberia, while filming animal adaptations to winter temperatures of 50 degrees below zero. Filming for nature documentaries often requires an ability to work in remote and hostile conditions, though appropriate cold weather equipment was purchased in London for this wildlife film before departure. 

Ellesmere Island, Northern Canada

Ellesmere Island, Northern Canada

Ellesmere Island, Northern Canada

White wolf, Ellesmere island, N Canada

Making a nature documentary in the Canadian High Arctic is very logistically complicated, as everything needs to be thought through in advance before departure from London. This wildlife film was based on Ellesmere island, one of the remotest places on earth and one of the most demanding nature documentaries ever made by Spider Movies. The film crew camped on the tundra with white wolves and gyr falcons. 

Tien Shan Mountains, Kazakhstan

Ellesmere Island, Northern Canada

Tien Shan Mountains, Kazakhstan

Foothills of the Tien Shan mountains, Kazakhstan

Taking the filming gear up to the base camp of the snow-capped peaks of the Tien Shan mountains in Kazakhstan required the service of many horses. Nature documentaries often require unusual  means of transport to reach final destinations in really remote places. This wildlife film was about the mountains of the former Soviet Union and included the Pamirs, the Altai and the Tien Shan for a series on BBC called 'Realms of the Russian Bear.'

Siberia

Ellesmere Island, Northern Canada

Tien Shan Mountains, Kazakhstan

Jacutia, E Siberia

The only way to reach the remotest parts of Siberia for a were via helicopter. The silence minutes after the aircraft departed was eerie compared to the hustle and bustle of London, but visiting remote areas of the Planet is one of the most rewarding aspect of making wildlife films.

Kamchatka, Russian Far East

Remote Rainforest, Venezuela

Kamchatka, Russian Far East

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At the time of making this wildlife film on the peninsula of Kamchatka in the Russian Far East, the Russian Parliament was stormed (the coup in 1991) leaving Fergus Beeley and cameraman, Martin Saunders abandoned in the wilderness as all the aircraft in Kamchatka's capital, Petrapavlovskkamchatski were redeployed as military aircraft back on the mainland. However, we were further from Moscow than London. Nature documentaries can be full of unexpected surprises when one is on location.

Kamchatka, Russian Far East

Remote Rainforest, Venezuela

Kamchatka, Russian Far East

Kamchatka

Cameraman, Martin Saunders emerges from an igloo (where he had spent more than 8 hours) which we made in order to remain concealed from Stellers Sa Eagles which were feeding on fish carcasses on the lake shore. This was at Lake Kurilski on the southern tip of Kamchatka, for a wildlife film on the Russian Far East for a series called 'Realms of the Russian Bear.' There have not been many nature documentaries filmed in this extraordinarily remote and beautiful part of Russia, though it takes nearly three days to get to the location from London.

Remote Rainforest, Venezuela

Remote Rainforest, Venezuela

Remote Rainforest, Venezuela

Rainforest Venezuela

The Spider Movies team in action. This wildlife film on the Harpy Eagle in the rainforest canopy in Venezuela was a real challenge for the film crew. Producer, Dr Adrian Seymour ascends on ropes into the top canopy carrying a large extra weight of  filming equipment. Much jungle canopy training had been undertaken back in UK. BBC crews returned to the same pair of Harpy Eagles for other nature documentaries such as BBC Planet Earth 2. 

Virry App

The creative team also have considerable experience in digital production. Virry Ap was created in TechHub, Old Street, London and became an Emmy Award and Childrens BAFTA Award 2016. The app contained live streaming from various locations around the world as well as short nature documentaries explaining further aspects of animal behaviour. The technology in this interactive wildlife app was remarkable. Making an app is more challenging than a traditional wildlife film.

BBC/PBS White Falcon, White Wolf

BBC Monkey-eating Eagle of the Orinoco

BBC Natural World Highland Haven

BBC Natural World - Return of the Eagle Owl

BBC Natural World - Spectacled Bears

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